12 Singles That Outshined The Albums They Came With

  • True Stories was a Talking Heads release that stirred some disenchantment among hardcore fans, but gave the world the song – and the video – “Wild Wild Life.” (Photo: Flickr)

  • Len’s album You Can’t Stop The Bum Rush is mostly a bummer, but they’re capable of a good song like “Steal my Sunshine.”…now and Len. (Photo: Twitter)

  • Rage Against The Machine’s undeniable “Bulls on Parade” far outpaced its album Evil Empire. (Photo: Wiki)

  • Oasis released the stinker Be Here Now in the mid-90s, receiving acclaim only for the single “D’You Know What I Mean.” (Photo: Flickr)

  • Bush’s “Swallowed” was a nice radio track, but its album Razorblade Suitcase was a lazy effort with a cliche title. (Photo: YouTube)

  • The Violent Femmes’ Hallowed Ground album was only saved by the brilliant “Country Death Song.” (Photo: Twitter)

  • REM phoned it in on 2004′s Around The Sun, but “Leaving New York” is a haunting track. (Photo: Twitter)

  • The Who’s 1982 LP was titled It’s Hard. No fooling – only the tune “Eminence Front” resonated with fans. (Photo: Archive)

  • The Clash: “This is England” is a memorable song on a forgettable album called Cut The Crap. (Photo: Pinterest)

  • The Smashing Pumpkins tamed drummer Jimmy Chamberlain into an almost unrecognizable pop sound on Machina, which did include the feel-good single “Stand Inside Your Love.” (Photo: Pinterest)

  • The Bravery proved that modern Freakbeat can run out of riffs, with only “An Honest Mistake” catching on from their self-titled debut. (Photo: Twitter)

  • Queen fumbled trying to adjust to a new aesthetic with 1980′s Hot Space, but when David Bowie whanged in for “Under Pressure,” all was forgiven. (Photo: Twitter)

True Stories was a Talking Heads release that stirred some disenchantment among hardcore fans, but gave the world the song – and the video – “Wild Wild Life.” (Photo: Flickr)

The single has come full circle. In the 60s, legendary producers like Mickie Most thought that albums were nothing – just something to stick out after a hit single. As rock & roll took center stage in the 70s and early 80s, LP records became popular spins on independent radio.

With the digital pop music revolution came a diverse range of use for the single track – from dance clubs to YouTube videos. Still, there’s a universal feeling of disappointment among fans when an artist releases a hot 3-minute rocker to promote an album, only to release a track list of filler that pales in comparison to the catchy bliss promised by the single.

Here are 15 artists who put it all into the singles – and dashed off depressingly-average LPs to go with them.


Tags assigned to this article:
David BowieLenThe Who

Latest News