The Gender Fluid Fashion Revolution Rumbles on

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Gender fluid fashion received a major boost in 2015 when the designer Alessandro Michele made his debut at Gucci in time for the Autumn / Winter range. (Photo: Gucci A/W_15-16/Release)
Gender fluid fashion received a major boost in 2015 when the designer Alessandro Michele made his debut at Gucci in time for the Autumn / Winter range. (Photo: Gucci A/W_15-16/Release)

We live in a progressive society where gender fluidity is embraced more than ever before. The community still faces many challenges but the wider society is more welcoming now than in any point in history.

Individuals are also starting to feel more confident and comfortable in public and that’s why gender fluid fashion has been developing quickly in order to keep pace. The endorsements of clothing ranges by certain celebrities have helped this particular cause but what should you be seen in over the coming seasons?

Breakthroughs
Gender fluid fashion received a major boost in 2015 when the designer Alessandro Michele made his debut at Gucci in time for the Autumn / Winter range. He was one of the first to use both male and female models to promote the same range of clothes and the term started to make its way into the public consciousness.

Pencil skirts quickly became a favourite among the boys and that remains a constant to this day. In the summer heatwave of 2018, many straights would have envied the gender fluids and perhaps the major fashion brands and high street shops may even have seen some new converts. Whatever the outcome, Michele was one of those to put down markers but where has the trend taken us in the present day?

A number of independent designers and small manufacturers are developing their ranges and there is no doubt that there is a gender fluid revolution going on in terms of clothing. (Photo: Release)
A number of independent designers and small manufacturers are developing their ranges and there
is no doubt that there is a gender fluid revolution going on in terms of clothing. (Photo: Release)

Challenges
A number of independent designers and small manufacturers are developing their ranges and there is no doubt that there is a gender fluid revolution going on in terms of clothing.

However, with the industry at a fairly embryonic stage, there are some stiff challenges.
Designers claim that funding simply isn’t available on the scale that the larger brands can attain so development is slow. Mass production from bigger retailers remains a distant thought but does the community want to have their clothes accessible on the high street anyway or would they prefer to remain exclusive?

The ‘knock on’ issue from this is the fact that gender fluid fashion remains expensive so there are obstacles left to negotiate but the revolution is on and it continues to gather momentum.

A Combined Future
There are some sources that cite gender fluid clothing to be the future of fashion for all preferences. That may not be good news for those members of the community who want to keep things to themselves, but wider interest will result in more choice. The lower end high street retailers have yet to embrace the concept but there has been some movement among some familiar brands.

In 2017, John Lewis moved to take boys and girls labelling away from their range as a means to remove discrimination from an early age. Others have been slow to follow but H&M have certainly grasped the baton, a project that started with their Unisex denim range and has continued to gather momentum ever since.

The popular store has been equipped with neutral ranges that cover T shirts, suits, tailored jackets and more. None of these items can be claimed by either sex and this is why H&M are starting to capture a large share of the market among gender fluid individuals.

Progress from 2015 has been steady rather than spectacular and there is much work to be done in order to conquer the mainstream but in a more welcoming society, gender fluidity’s fashion bandwagon continues to roll on.

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